AuthorEveryday Speech

Social Skills Videos Round 2 – Coming Late Summer 2015

Social Skills Videos Round 2

Our social skills videos library is getting even bigger! We’ve gotten such great feedback from you on our first batch of videos, we’re adding a ton more. Our current library is 35 videos, and we’re planning on adding 40-45 more. That means our library will more than double!

If you’re not familiar with our social skills videos, they are short, 1:30-2:30 minute videos designed to help SLP’s, Special Ed Teachers, and behavioral professionals teach social skills to diverse learners. Each video walks the student through the key concept using narration and on screen text. We then show an unexpected behavior, and talk about how it made the people in the situation feel through thought bubbles and internal thoughts. After reinforcing the topic, we show the expected behavior and see how the situation changes.

Our new videos will continue to build on the solid base of videos we already have. Your feedback has been much appreciated and we expect this batch of videos to be the best ones yet.

How Can I Get the Videos?

Right now we’re running a launch special on our subscription. It’s currently 50% off for the monthly subscription, and the annual subscription saves you even more! You’ll get access to all our current videos, and when we add our next round of videos, you’ll get them automatically at no extra charge! Visit this link to learn more about purchasing options.

If you’re planning on using the videos for next year, subscribing now will save you substantially over subscribing in the fall.

Enjoy the videos, and as always, contact us with any questions.

Getting Started With VHX

So you’ve downloaded our social skills videos, now what? We need to get you watching! This post explains all the ways you can view your videos on VHX. It’s really an amazing solution, allowing you to watch your videos from anywhere that has an internet connection.

Getting Started

During the checkout process, you were asked to enter an email address. After your purchase, you should immediately receive an email with a link to watch the videos. Clicking on that link will bring you to your library. You may have to perform a device verification step where VHX emails you a link to register your device. You should only have to do this once per device you register.

It’s important to note that you will have access to the videos for as long as the subscription is active.

Streaming your Videos from vhx.tv – Watch from ANY Computer

It’s annoying to have to go back to your email every time you want to watch the videos. Don’t worry, you won’t have to! Just bookmark this link: https://www.vhx.tv/library

If you aren’t signed in, you will be prompted to when you visit the site. Just use the same email you used to purchase the videos. You can do this from any computer, so if you’re caught without yours, or in a different classroom, you can just log in and get your videos anywhere.

If you have Apple TV, Roku, or Chromecast in your classroom, you can easily stream the videos over these services.

Finding Videos

Our library is already large, and it’s constantly growing! It might be difficult for you to find the video you’re looking for. So, we’ve created an index page with worksheet links for you. You can find that page here.

Once you know the name of the video you’d like to watch, simply select the “search” button at the top of the screen:

VHX Search Button

and start typing in the video you’d like to watch. The video should magically appear before you!

Watching From Your iPad

With VHX, you can stream videos directly to your iPad. You can also sync them for offline use, just like you can on the computer. To download the VHX app, please visit this link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/vhx/id935740658?mt=8, or search “VHX” in the app store.

Logging in to the App

When you first open the app, enter in the email you used when you purchased the videos. VHX may send you an email to ensure it’s you, but you should only have to do this once.

Viewing Videos

Once you log in and confirmed your email, the videos you own will appear right in front of you! If you click on the package, you should see a list of collections – these are just playlists we organized the videos into. Click a collection to see the list of videos.


From here, you can search the list of videos by clicking the magnifying glass in the upper right hand corner, or you can click on a video to start watching!

Once you’ve clicked on a video, you can click on the icon that looks like a cloud with a down arrow to offline sync the video – meaning you can watch it without an internet connection.

Any video you synced can be removed from the device by clicking that same button, which should have turned into an “X” after you synced it.

After that, to get started viewing a video, simply press play (the play button is the triangle icon on the video itself)! You can press the square button in the lower right hand corner of the video to make it play full screen.

Watching from an iPad Without the App/Watching From Android Tablets

If you’re caught without your iPad (the horror!), you can also simply go to https://www.vhx.tv/library from the web browser on any iPad and log in just as you would on a computer. The videos will work just fine!

For Android tablet users, you can download the VHX app from the Google Play store here. The process to watch videos is similar to the one described for the iPad above.

Companion Worksheets – an Activity for Every Video

Go beyond just the videos with our companion worksheets! Each video has a worksheet, so you can work on applying the skill you just learned! Create entire lessons around a single video! To find the worksheet you want, visit our Social Skills Videos Index.

From there you can search, filter, and sort to quickly find what you need!

Forums – Converse With Fellow Therapists

With forums from VHX, you now have a place to discuss everything social skills with your fellow therapists. You can talk about new activities, ideas you have for videos, or anything else under the sun. Simply visit our forum at https://everydayspeechsocialskillsvideos.vhx.tv/forums to get started.

You can start your own threads, follow other threads to get automatic updates, or just pop in every now and then to get inspired.

Wrapping Up

As you’ve seen, you can pretty much do it all with VHX. Unlike physical DVD’s, these videos can never be lost or broken! By allowing you to login to your library from anywhere, you can be assured that you’ll always have access to these videos.

If you have further questions, comments, or issues playing your videos, contact us. Happy watching!

Continue Reading

Let’s Learn Emotions v1.2 Now Available!

Hey everyone!

We wanted to let you know that Let’s Learn Emotions v1.2 is now available! We made a few changes for this version, the biggest being the addition of another matching game.

In our previous versions, our Matching Game was limited to matching the name of an emotion to one of three images:

Matching Game

 

In this newest version, we added another game that is essentially the opposite of this game. You now can also match an image to a list of three emotions:

2nd Matching Game

It’s just another way we can add some more fun!

Other changes include some minor bug fixes, controls to change the rate of text to speech, and a Spanish language version!

You can download Let’s Learn Emotions here.

Let us know what you think!

Let’s be Social – Social Skills Video: Keeping Personal Space

View Let's be Social on the App StoreThis blog post is part of a multi-part series on the lessons that come standard in our app, Let’s be Social. Each post breaks down why we included this particular story, with commentary from Brittany Lehane, CCC-SLP, as well as a short overview of our lesson.

With 40 lessons standard and premium video lessons, Let’s be Social has become a go-to app iPad app for Speech Pathologists, Special Education Teachers, Behavioral Professionals, and Parents to use with those learning social skills, including those who have autism. To learn more about Let’s be Social and hear why it’s been called a “dream come true”, check it out here.

Why Keeping Personal Space?

Personal space is such an important concept to teach because it impacts people in a big way. If your personal space is violated, you automatically 0196b426eb4fd9a722115f216c80267a378723d94bfeel upset and uncomfortable. This is not the way we want people to feel. To start, it’s important to define personal space and show what it looks like because it is an abstract concept and therefore may be difficult for our kids to understand. Our video lesson models the appropriate way to give personal space and what happens if you don’t. We focus on the negative result of invading someone’s space. We also analyze how the character feels when he isn’t given personal space.

Our Lesson

We first learn that keeping personal space means giving people enough space to feel comfortableEveryone likes to have their 014c901200357f881c12c2d6c8f7331ee3497f7fadown bubble of space. If somebody comes into that bubble, it makes people feel uncomfortable.

Our scene opens with Owen sitting at a table, reading a book. Johnny enters with a football in his hand. It looks like he wants to play catch. He asks Owen what he’s doing. Owen gets an strange look on his face and scoots his chair away from Johnny.

When we dive into each person’s thoughts, Owen wonders why Johnny is sitting so close. He says he doesn’t like it. We learn that Owen feels uncomfortable. When we find out what Johnny is thinking, 01f3810b6f75001db1d5bdb548488ef443c45306a7_00002we find out he feels confused. He just wanted to see what Johnny was up to. What did Johnny do wrong? He didn’t give Owen personal space.

After reinforcing our concepts, we go back to the scene at the table. This time, when Johnny sits down, he leaves a good amount of space between himself and Owen. After talking for a minute, the kids decide they want to go out to play catch.

Remember, everyone needs their own space to feel comfortable.

01a64eb908fdfa0fba8406885cada87850ca57d95c

Note: The information above is provided as a resource only, and in no way replaces the services performed by an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

Let’s be Social – Social Skills Video: Making Eye Contact

View Let's be Social on the App StoreThis blog post is part of a multi-part series on the lessons that come standard in our app, Let’s be Social. Each post breaks down why we included this particular story, with commentary from Brittany Lehane, CCC-SLP, as well as a short overview of our lesson.

With 40 lessons standard and premium video lessons, Let’s be Social has become a go-to app iPad app for Speech Pathologists, Special Education Teachers, Behavioral Professionals, and Parents to use with those learning social skills, including those who have autism. To learn more about Let’s be Social and hear why it’s been called a “dream come true”, check it out here.

Why Making Eye Contact?

01e936f6a1798d28771fec0256a148ec24feeaea4cMaking eye contact is one of the basic social skills and also one of the most important. Eye contact establishes who you are talking to and can be an indicator of what you are feeling or thinking about. Our video lesson models the appropriate way to make eye contact and what will happen if you don’t. We emphasize how other people will feel if you don’t make eye contact with them during a conversation.

We also teach the consequence of not making eye contact which is other people will have negative thoughts. In our video, the main character doesn’t make eye contact and the result is that his friend feels confused and thinks he doesn’t want to talk. These negative consequences help the main character understand how important eye contact is.

Our Video

01f3810b6f75001db1d5bdb548488ef443c45306a7We start out by learning that Making Eye Contact means looking at a person you’re having a conversation with. Not just when you’re talking either. When you’re listening, it’s important to still make eye contact because it shows you’re interested.

When Owen and Johnny start talking about their weekend, Johnny tells Owen about how much fun he has. He asks Owen how his weekend went. Owen says he got a new, awesome video game this weekend, but when he talks, he looks down at the desk, and not at Johnny. Johnny looks puzzled. Was Owen talking to him?

When we go into each person’s thoughts, Johnny says that he is confused. He doesn’t know if Owen didn’t hear him or wants to talk to him.

01c08c44843b8cf290b8750a1c7ee339e7454cbb45When Owen tries again, he looks right at Owen and tells him about his new video game, and looks Johnny in the eye. The conversation went smoothly. We wrap up by reinforcing that eye contact is important, because it let’s them know who you’re talking to, and shows that you’re interested.

Note: The information above is provided as a resource only, and in no way replaces the services performed by an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

Découvrons les émotions: émotions et habiletés sociales en éducation spécialisée, thérapie du langage et orthophonie

C’est avec plaisir que nous vous présentons Découvrons les émotions, la version française de Let’s learn Emotions. Avec Découvrons les émotions, l’apprentissage des émotions n’a jamais été aussi interactif!

Avec un contenu rédigé par une orthophoniste certifiée, Découvrons les émotions est une bonne façon pour les orthophonistes, enseignants et parents d’enseigner les différentes facettes des émotions.  Avec 15 émotions courantes et trois modes interactifs, Découvrons les émotions est un bon outil que l’on peut apporter partout avec soi.

Avec la possibilité de créer vos propres émotions en utilisant vos photos, Découvrons les émotions est un outil assez puissant et flexible pour répondre aux besoins variés de tous les utilisateurs.

Découvrons les émotions comprend trois modes : Cartes-éclair, Associations et Discussion.

Les Cartes-éclair permettent aux utilisateurs de s’exercer en devinant à quelle émotion correspond chacune des expressions faciales présentées.  Chaque carte-éclair décrit l’émotion afin que l’utilisateur puisse comprendre les différents messages transmis par les yeux, les sourcils, la bouche et l’attitude en général.

Le jeu Associations présente trois images et demande à l’utilisateur de trouver l’image correspondant au nom de l’émotion présentée.  Un essai incorrect apparaît en rouge, tandis qu’une bonne réponse apparaît en vert, donnant une rétroaction immédiate à l’utilisateur.  Les émotions peuvent être ordonnées aléatoirement afin de s’assurer que deux parties ne soient jamais identiques!

Le jeu Discussion a pour but d’aller un peu plus loin en abordant quand et comment les gens ressentent certaines émotions.   À chaque tour, une émotion et un énoncé visant à encourager la discussion sont présentés à l’utilisateur.  Mieux qu’un simple rappel, cela met l’émotion en contexte.  Ex. : Quand t’es-tu senti comme cela?  Si ton ami se sentait comme cela, que lui dirais-tu?

Le jeu Discussion favorise également les vraies interactions avec certains énoncés qui demandent aux participants d’élaborer une mise en scène ou encore de faire un visage représentant une émotion tout en demandant aux autres participants de deviner.

Les utilisateurs ont la possibilité de créer leurs propres énoncés en un éclair afin de construire un jeu unique en quelques secondes.

Liste des fonctionnalités :

  • 15 émotions courantes
  • Magnifiques photos de personnes réelles
  • Trois modes de jeu : Cartes-éclair, Associations et Discussion
  • Possibilité de créer vos propres émotions en utilisant vos propres photos et textes!
  • Possibilité de créer vos propres énoncés pour le jeu Discussion
  • Synthèse vocale en support
  • Plusieurs réglages à personnaliser
  • Magnifique conception intuitive mettant l’emphase sur les émotions

Découvrons les émotions vient avec assez de contenu pour une prise en mains et une utilisation immédiate par les orthophonistes, enseignants et parents, mais est assez puissante et flexible pour répondre à tout autre besoin des utilisateurs.  Téléchargez-la dès aujourd’hui pour l’essayer!

Continue Reading

Let’s be Social: Being Teased

View Let's be Social on the App StoreThis blog post is part of a multi-part series on the lessons that come standard in our app, Let’s be Social. Each post breaks down why we included this particular story, with commentary from Brittany Lehane, CCC-SLP, as well as a short overview of our lesson.

With 40 lessons standard and premium video lessons, Let’s be Social has become a go-to app iPad app for Speech Pathologists, Special Education Teachers, Behavioral Professionals, and Parents to use with those learning social skills, including those who have autism. To learn more about Let’s be Social and hear why it’s been called a “dream come true”, check it out here.

Why Being Teased?

Unfortunately teasing is an inevitable part of life that all of us go through. It is especially concerning for students with special needs and social challenges. Our lesson aims to teach children how to handle teasing when it occurs. By teaching what to do and what not to do, our students will gain the skills to handle being teased. Another area of concern is recognizing when you are being teased. Some kids don’t know when people are laughing with them or at them. This distinction is an important social skill to learn. This is an area where being able to recognize emotions will be an important skill. Once students can recognize how they feel they can then start to think about what to do when they feel that way.

Our Lesson

Being TeasedTom teases Mark by calling him stupid. This makes Mark feel both embarrassed and sad. When a friend is acting like this, Mark should just walk away, because Tom isn’t being a good friend. We find out that Tom didn’t mean to make Mark feel bad, he was only joking. He should apologize, and realize that even though he didn’t mean it, jokes can hurt people’s feelings. 

Note: The information above is provided as a resource only, and in no way replaces the services performed by an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

Let’s be Social: Sitting in Class

View Let's be Social on the App StoreThis blog post is part of a multi-part series on the lessons that come standard in our app, Let’s be Social. Each post breaks down why we included this particular story, with commentary from Brittany Lehane, CCC-SLP, as well as a short overview of our lesson.

With 40 lessons standard and premium video lessons, Let’s be Social has become a go-to app iPad app for Speech Pathologists, Special Education Teachers, Behavioral Professionals, and Parents to use with those learning social skills, including those who have autism. To learn more about Let’s be Social and hear why it’s been called a “dream come true”, check it out here.

Why Sitting in Class?

Learning the rules of the school day is especially difficult for our students with weak social skills. Every situation requires different skills which can be confusing for our kids.  The lesson Sitting in Class is based on common situations that occur every day in class such as the teacher asking the class to move to a new location. The students are expected to follow the direction but our kiddos may have a hard time. It also includes how to ask for help when you are confused at school. This can be hard for our students to learn. As a speech therapist, I spend a lot of time teaching how to ask for help.

Our Lesson

Sitting in ClassIn Tom’s class, it’s time for reading. The teacher tells the class to sit in a circle. We learn the students should walk and sit down quietly. Tom hears his other classmates talking, which is distracting for him. Tom shouldn’t yell at them though, he should try to pay attention to the teacher and let the teacher handle it. During the story, Tom gets confused. Rather than stop listening, he should ask the teacher a question so he understands. The teacher calls on Tom to answer a question. He doesn’t know the answer, but he can always ask for help.

Note: The information above is provided as a resource only, and in no way replaces the services performed by an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

Let’s be Social: Making Inappropriate Noises

View Let's be Social on the App StoreThis blog post is part of a multi-part series on the lessons that come standard in our app, Let’s be Social. Each post breaks down why we included this particular story, with commentary from Brittany Lehane, CCC-SLP, as well as a short overview of our lesson.

With 40 lessons standard and premium video lessons, Let’s be Social has become a go-to app iPad app for Speech Pathologists, Special Education Teachers, Behavioral Professionals, and Parents to use with those learning social skills, including those who have autism. To learn more about Let’s be Social and hear why it’s been called a “dream come true”, check it out here.

Why Making Inappropriate Noises?

Our students tend to have difficulty picking up on the cues around them. For example, they may be telling their friend a long story and don’t notice their friend looking down at their watch with a worried look on their face. In this situation, our student isn’t picking up on his friend’s facial expression or body language, both of which are screaming “I need to go!”

Similarly, the Making Inappropriate Noises lesson teaches how to recognize the social cues around you and why it’s important. Many of my students have some sort of behavior they do that calms them (such as making noises) but has a negative impact on others. By teaching students to think from another’s perspective they can start to see how their actions make others feel and what the consequence of those actions will be.

Our Lesson

Making Inappropriate NoisesTom likes to make loud noises. His teacher tells Tom not to make loud noises.  We learn that if you make loud noises, other people might have bad thoughts about you. They might become annoyed. Tom’s mom tells him that he should make these noises outside, and shouldn’t make these noises when it is quiet. When he wants to make these noises but he can’t, he can squeeze a ball or squeeze his hands together. Tom feels happy when he can run outside and be loud!

Note: The information above is provided as a resource only, and in no way replaces the services performed by an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

Let’s be Social: Making Friends

View Let's be Social on the App StoreThis blog post is part of a multi-part series on the lessons that come standard in our app, Let’s be Social. Each post breaks down why we included this particular story, with commentary from Brittany Lehane, CCC-SLP, as well as a short overview of our lesson.

With 40 lessons standard and premium video lessons, Let’s be Social has become a go-to app iPad app for Speech Pathologists, Special Education Teachers, Behavioral Professionals, and Parents to use with those learning social skills, including those who have autism. To learn more about Let’s be Social and hear why it’s been called a “dream come true”, check it out here.

Why Making Friends?

For kids with social impairments, making friends can be really hard. The Making Friends lesson in Let’s be Social teaches ways of interacting that can result in forming friendships. It lays the foundation for forming a friendship and the many other skills that can be practiced and learned along the way. A lot of my students want to make friends but aren’t sure how to go about it. It’s important to start with the idea of reaching out to people and teaching how to be more social, and the friendships will follow from there.

Our Lesson

Making FriendsFriends play together and have fun. They are nice to each other. When Rachel sees a group of kids playing on the playground, she wants to play too. She should ask to join them. She shouldn’t interrupt their game, but she should show she is interested by asking what they are doing. When the group tells her that they are playing kickball, she says “I love kickball. Can I join a team?” Rachel joins the group. She feels happy. She likes playing with friends!

Note: The information above is provided as a resource only, and in no way replaces the services performed by an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

Login

 Lost your password?
x